who is god? what is art?

yellow, blue, and red
my feet among you tread…

Those are questions asked by the artist in the illustrated poem – PALIA HORA – which is Greek for Old Capital City (or town). Palia Hora of Aegina island once was the home of the entire island. It was in the centre of the island and afforded (and still affords) magnificent views over the entire Saronic Gulf – which was it’s downfall, as the inhabitants turned to piracy – and the Sultan of the Ottoman Empire ordered his General (Barrabus) to destroy the town and kill all its people – as a matter of a lesson to all – The Greek people built the town over a thousand years – and each important family had their own Chapel to worship God (Greek Orthodox) . Barrabus – (who mother was Greek) however left 32 chapels standing in remembrance of his brother (who died at the early age of 32) and out of respect for his mother. Today the Chapels have been restored (respectfully) by the Greek Church and visitors can now see murals in the chapels from the 12th to the 15th century by master Greek painters whose names have faded with time.

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painters TUBES magazine -Denis Taylor
an illustrated poem by Denis Taylor Artist and editor of painters TUBES magazine

artists of the revolution

When you think of the word ‘Revolution’ another word automatically springs to mind to precede it….

painters Tubes magazine.
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extract from the essay:

…When you think of the word ‘Revolution’ another word automatically springs to mind to precede it. American is one, French and Russian perhaps are others. These Revolutions involved violence, out right war and sudden social changes.  Few people automatically think to put the word ‘Industrial’ in front of that emotive word. Maybe because the ‘Industrial Revolution’ was more of a ‘slow burn’ and happened over time, a slow change to society rather than a dramatic instant thrust of evident and far reaching dramatic changes of the social fabric like the well known revolutions.

Yet the industrial revolution was by far the most important and influential revolution that has ever happened to civilisation since someone in the middle east discovered that a seed bearing plant could be turned into food (bread). That particular amazing ‘discovery’ enabled ‘spare-time’ for humanity to develop other skills and helped to propel a human society beyond the limitations of living as the nomadic hunter gatherers that humans had been living for millenniums up to that point.

For our story, about how the industrial revolution affected Art and Artists, let’s start by making some educated assumptions as to why the Industrial Revolution came about. Without labouring on the individual details too much, you could say it was the need to increase productivity for goods to trade with for a growing population. Initially, the energy needed for these goods was provided by manual labour, mules or horses to haul the wood that gave-up it’s stored energy, directly or through the making of charcoal that provided the power to make other things, like smelting metals or firing pottery. Manufacturers also used ‘water driven’ machinery to increase productivity in food production (i.e. bread). And then the most important source of energy of all was unearthed (literally) as the best energy source of all, Coal. This was, by far, the most important of all the energy sources, because it was cheap, plentiful, efficient and England, in particular, had plenty of it. The fact that ‘Coal Power’ greatly expanded the production of goods is unquestionable and it was to change the face of Western Civilisation as much as ‘ Crude Oil’ did in the latter part of the 20th century.   continued…

Ian Mood – new work

“common ground.” will be exhibited in the art School’s fabulous building and exhibition space.

Featured in the upcoming issue #8 of painters Tubes magazine, will be Ian Mood, a painter who is creating a unique series of work based on his Grand fathers paintings of Stoke-on-Trent. It’s an idea that emerged slowly over time and Ian has now established a project studio in the Stoke City Centre, to make the idea a reality. During our Editor’s visit, Ian introduced him to the trustee’s of Burslem School of Art, http://www.burslemschoolofart.com/, that also have a fascinating story to tell.

Ian’s series of work – “common ground.” – will be exhibited in the art School’s fabulous building and exhibition space. Tubes issue #8 will be discussing the project and taking a general look at Ian’s work over the last years, which includes some unique semi-abstract (expressionist) paintings dealing with the human form and also his earlier landscape paintings…Tubes issue#8….not to be missed.

Painters Tubes in Stoke on Trent UK
Ian Mood in his new studio (Stoke-on-Trent, UK)

image©painterstubesmagazine/DenisTaylor 2018

CPH Art Space

it was a very cold Easter Saturday we visited the Copenhagen Art Space for an annual exhibition…

Denis Taylor Artist at CPH art spaceIt was a very cold Easter Saturday that both myself and Marianne (sub-editor of Tubes) visited the Copenhagen Art Space for an annual exhibition. The venue is situated in the developing Nordhavbn (North Harbour) part of the Danish Capital City. The venue known as ‘Docken’ is a space which is expansive and well appointed. Art Space 2018 is an Art and Culture event that is approaching ten years old. The show runs over three days which may bring to mind Art Fairs in the UK, however this exhibition has the feeling of    a Salon, rather than an Art Fair.

Denis Taylor Artist and Editor of painters Tubes magazine at Copenhagen Art SpaceThe warm laid back welcoming that you get when entering the show made up for the bitter cold wind outside and allowed you to really enjoy what’s on offer. It was a breath of fresh air to witness the space given to each artist who exhibited, of which their were Sixty, all showing high quality, original, authentic work that was diverse enough for everyone’s particular taste. I began thinking that the space and the way it was presented could be a guiding light for the UK and Artists  to organize themselves to mount this sort of exhibition in similar spaces in the UK of which there are plenty available.

For me it was an opportunity to catch up with an old artist friend, Preben Saxild, an artist I had exhibited with in Stockholm at the Heart 2 Art exhibition in 2002. And one who’s work I have been following since before 1998. Preben has developed as an artist from being a very talented abstract expressionist, through to creating his unique landscape phase, and now a new line of work which is montage based, but with his own unique ‘take’ on life, one tinged with ‘irony’ political comment and sheer luxurious image making.

CPH3
Preben Saxild (left) and Denis Taylor (Editor of Tubes) catching up on his new work

Besides some great paintings there were also fabulous ceramic and metal sculptures on show, again I wished that the UK artists and private art galleries could visit these type of exhibitions in Skandinavia and be inspired by the originality of the Art, which is far more adventurous, in style and subject matter, (in my opinion), than most of the UK visual art that I have viewed over the last four or five years (in commercial galleries).
Below are a selection of some photographs (©Tubes magazine) of the venue and the art.